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Suffering from an Unstable Pelvis?

Updated: Oct 13, 2023

The SI joint is part of the pelvis. SI Joint means sacroiliac joint and we actually have 2 of them. It is where the side pelvis bone (or the ilium) meets the spine where your sacrum is. So where your right ilium or pelvis bone meets the sacrum is your RIGHT SI joint, and then you have the left ilium that meets the sacrum and makes your LEFT SI joint. Also, your 2 ilium bones or pelvis bones meet in the front at your pubic symphysis on the front of the pelvis and this is also a joint.

It's important to know where your joints are (especially when you have hypermobility) because that means the bones can move in this area and could potentially cause pain with the wrong activities.


Sacroiliac Joint pain is often worse with movement, especially asymmetrical weightbearing activities like:

-Sitting with legs or ankles crossed as this causes you to put more pressure on one cheek than the other

-Crossing your knee past middle of your body

-Sitting in the “Cleopatra” position - sitting sideways on a couch with your legs up.

-Standing with more weight on 1 leg or your pelvis cocked to one side

-Walking and hiking activities

-Climbing stairs

-Deep bending or deep squatting activities

-Pregnancy and Postpartum due to the pregnancy hormones moving the pelvis to birth a baby


So minimizing some of these positions and activities can help calm your pain while you are working on building stability to these joints. And It's important to know your body's habits and what your triggers are so you can minimize them. Trust me, you body will thank you when you start making these changes.


In some cases, it may be necessary to wear a Sacroiliac Belt.  SI belts are specifically designed to hold the joints together to facilitate healing while you are building strength and stability around the pelvis.

Recommended SI Joint Belt (affiliated link): https://amzn.to/42Uca12


Do you or someone you know suffer from Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder or Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome? Or do you think you or someone you know might have HSD/hEDS? Save my page or share this link with them. I can help answer questions that might have been unanswered for so many years.


Thanks!


-Stay Strong. Stay Flexible.

Jessica




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